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Animals and Birds of Commercial Value

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If I thought we were not all grown-up this set would not be on the website. Okay, I cannot actually agree with some of the contents of some of the cards on this planet and it is not my job to defend them but they were issued, they were collected and are collected and at the time of issue there was not a lot of people complaining about the content it was just not contentious. If you want to do something about the fur trade etc my advice is don't buy the stuff.

...the Zebra, this thing died to become rugs and slippers

Hopefully I have given this set a big enough 'horror' rating that what comes next will be a complete anti-climax. Gallaher produced a set of 100 cards in 1917 called Plants of Commerical Value and naturally followed it up after the bloodshed of World War One (20 million odd killed) with Animals & Birds of Commerical Value in 1921 again a 100 card set.

Start making a list of 100 animals and birds of commercial value.

It is obviously a large (perhaps monstorous set) and I am not going to be listing all 100 of the poor blighters but I am going to be picking out some of the ones with high 'ahh' factor in the modern world, the furry ones with those big round eyes that get so much good press.

The ugly scaly ones or those vile bats need not get mentioned we seem perfectly happy to see them die out as they do not have the right 'cute' factor for saving.

So lets skip number one (its a Penguin) and straight in with number 2 a squirrel (looks like a red squirrel illustrated). Its a rat but for a bushy tail but that tail hits the 'ahh' factor nicely also turns out to be pretty useful for making into bags and brushes.

Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) you are going to discover a lot of these animals ended their days as cosmetics or as things to carry cosmetics in or just wrapped around various bits of the female anatomy.

I say fortunately as women seem rather more sensitive to these issues nowadays if the mole (card 3) was discovered to make a wonderful pair of football boots odds are us blokes would still be rushing around in a pair of mole football boots. Is that a good example?

Card 5 the Zebra this thing died to become rugs and slippers among other things and the card notes it is gradually becoming extinct.

Kill all this lot and Santa will not be delivering presents this year.

GALAHER, Animals & Birds of Commerical Value

Something of a evolutionary error having a good looking hide obviously turns out the Polar Bear has equal problems keeping its coat on its back (card 7). At least there is a lot of Polar Bear I suppose.

...we are into the 'ahh' factor and 'how dreadful' region

The Swan appears on card 13 but it turns out to be protected by Royal decree so it would seem people were reduced to following the blighters about until feathers dropped out of them which were eagerly accumulated for powder-puffs, cushions, quills and toothpicks.

Card 20 need be no surprise, Cow & Calf. I did not know we were making felting for roofs out of cow hair though, impressive. All very yummy darn pity the Brits have managed to pollute the food chain to the extent that British beef has a slight possibility of turning you brain inside out.

Card 26 Red Fox, apparently the North American version is better than the European effort. The card describes its fur as being ferruginous in colour, reason enough to be mentioned here.

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