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Card issues Feb 1925, the roaring twenties.

cigarette cards

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Public School Ties Series [1925] was the subject of choice (50 cards) which I presume reflected the type of customer the business had. Or then again it did not as the experiment with cards was not repeated for whatever reason.

Certainly the idea of presenting ties on cigarette cards could have created a mighty dull set. Churchman made a determined effort some 9-10 years later with two series of 25 cards and a couple of larger sized series of 12 cards apiece and that pretty much is it.

This could be considered par for the course until you consider just how much mileage was ground out of such things as national flags and sports badges.

There is no reason why ties could not have formed the basis for some interesting sets. Certainly when you see the direction Churchman took the idea for my money it would have been a darn sight more interesting than 150 cards showing Army Corps and Divisional Badges. Anyway my voice does not amount to much 70 odd years after the event, if it ever did.

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Smokers of the English arm of the French firm Societe Job (ceased trading in 1939) were also in for a treat this year. The firm were not what could be considered prolific issuers of cards, the first series was in 1909, Racehorses, 1911 saw a series of Dogs and 1912 a series of Liners and they had remained quiet until resumption of card issues in 1924 with Orders of Chivalry [1924]. All of which are less than easy to find nowadays.

There was a certain stamp of 'seen it before' about the subjects chosen. Then in 1925 came something different in the form of British Lighthouses [1925]. A real treat for all, given Lighthouses are pretty rare as subject matter. This is somewhat baffling when you consider the amount of links there are between tobacco and the seafaring business in general.

Duke (USA) had led the way with the 1890 series Lighthouses (Die-Cut) but there had been nothing for the UK market a situation which basically remains true as Wills (NZ) Lighthouses [1926] as a series of cards destined for New Zealand.
Got a light mate?

Societe Job followed with some Cinema Star issues and the final two issues from this firm were Orders of Chivalry [1927]. You have to see Lighthouses as a high point of imagination for this group and more power to them for the effort.
Got a light mate?
SOCIETE JOB,
BRITISH
LIGHTHOUSES


From the rather smaller players in the world of cigarettes back to a bigger player, Godfrey Phillips. In 1925 they produced a commendably early entrant into the world of cinema stars with the workmanlike title, Cinema Stars, there were 30 cards in the series.

This was a theme, and therefore a name, which served them well. The first appearance of a Cinema Star card from this company had been a couple of years earlier in 1923.

This series having 52 cards, clearly someone at G.Phillips was being different. In 1924 there was another issue of Cinema Stars, although 25 cards in the series the difference here was the circular nature of the card. They were issued in round tins hence the shape.

These were some of the first opportunities for the smoking public to see the on-screen heroes tucked away in packets of cigarettes. As we all know it was hardly going to be the last opportunity they were afforded.

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